Wholly Canadian is a social enterprise promoting whole-life local living
...a breath of fresh air for those with a heart for local /fair-trade living, & inspiration for those intrigued...
                                     

Wholly Canadian Blog

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Milk Chocolate Easter Treats: Fair-trade meets Local

Happy Easter Season! In the spirit of Easter (celebrating New Life), Wholly Canadian is excited to share how to bring life & community to your Easter treats.

By the way this recipe is wholly wonderful all-year round! You can simply make chocolate bark, or use other festive/ holiday candy moulds.



Instead of buying the cheap sugar-laden chocolate bunnies made with cocoa beans harvested by workers earning third-world wages, make your own with this oh-so-simple fair-trade recipe. . .with only 4 ingredients.



You can pour the chocolate in candy moulds, or simply make bark.


Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup Canadian-grown raw hazelnuts
      • alternatively you can use any nut of your choice
  • 1 soft plump Level-Ground trading fair-trade vanilla pod
      • alternatively you can use 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup locally-farmed cream (I used organic Harmony unhomogenized whipping cream)
  • 2 bags of Camino semi-sweet fair-trade chocolate chips; approx 16 grams total
      • alternatively you can use bitter-sweet chocolate chips if you desire less sugar

 Many fair-trade ingredients can be found at Ten Thousand Villages

This recipe is a variation of our Valentine's Dark Chocolate Bark



Step 1: Wholesome Food Prep

  • Soak & deyhydrate the hazelnuts

You can skip this step if you do not wish to do this to soak the nuts.


 

Step 2:  Putting it all together

  1. You can make a bark, or else pour chocolate in candy moulds.
    • Bark: Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, leaving a small overhang. If you are not using a stoneware pan, you may want to grease the pan prior to placing the parchment paper, so that the paper is easily lifted later. Set the pan aside.
    • Candy moulds: prepare and wash them. Make sure they are completely dry.
  2. Extract the vanilla seeds from the vanilla pod (or alternativley pour in 1/2 tsp vanilla extract once chocolate is melted)
    • See this link as a resource, or see this video for help on extracting the vanilla seeds
    • Research the many ways you can use the remaining vanilla pod
  3. In a double boiler, begin to melt the chocolate chips.
    • Add the coconut seed paste from the vanilla pod.
    • Add the 1/4 cup cream
  4. Chop/grind the nuts into smaller pieces--as desired
  5. Continue to stir the chocolate. Make sure no water gets into the pot or the chocolate will seize.
  6. Pour the mixture:
    • Bark: Spread the chocolate over the prepared sheet with a spatula; it may not reach to each corner of the pan. That's okay. Create a "puddle" of chocolate according to how thin you want your bark.
    • Candy Moulds: Pour in the chocolate. Tap the mould on a hard surface so as to remove any air bubbles.
      • Fill as many moulds as possible. You may also use the remainder of the chocoalate for bark as I did--in a small bar pan.
  7. Liberally sprinkle the chopped nuts on the warm chocolate. Gently press, with your fingers, the nuts in the chocolate using a tiny bit of pressue.
  8. Place in the fridge for 30 minutes; or freezer for 15 min.
  9. To serve:
    • Bark: Break into bite-sized pieces.
    • Candy Moulds: remove the chocolate and wrap attractively

 


Step 3: Enjoyment

To store, place in an air-tight container, or freeze for longer shelf-life.


Wrap them up to give as gifts.

Enjoy these bites of pure pleasure!



Easter decor:

  • vintage glass hen, vintage milk glass bowl, heritage eggs naturally coloured, and a re-purposed crate.
  • I planted wheat kernels (the same wheat that I mill for baking bread) 10 days prior to these pics.


 

Why makes this recipe outstanding?

1. Nourishment: Whole Nutrition

    • whole cream--no modified milk ingredients
    • simple ingredients--most chocolate treats and chocolate chips have added soy lecithin, but not this premium chocolate!
    • recipe uses organic non-GMO ingredients, but it doesn't end there. . .
    • this recipe also involves traditional wholly nourishing food preparation; this quality of product is generally not available on grocery shelves
      • the nuts have been soaked using traditional methods to aid digestion; eliminating the anti-nutrients (phytic acid)  that contribute to gas and digestive pain associated with seeds and grains


2. Social Justice: Community Orientation

    • this recipe uses all local and/or fair-trade ingredients. . .
    • every bite is a bite of community & goodwill. . . rather than buying what is "cheapest for me," it thinks "we". . . giving way to true joy
    • for a good resource on why this matters see "Why localism"; many of the same principles also apply to fair-trade

 

 


What type of Easter treats do you have planned? Share with our readers.


 

Make sure to check out all our Easter posts. . . here and here.

fair-trade finger puppets


  Check out this Canadian-made Easter bunny that hopped here from Saskatoon, SK. . . . lovingly made by Mary Grishchenko of Mashenka Rose.


Happy Easter!

Posted by Wholly Canadian at 7:00 AM 3 Comments

Saturday, December 12, 2015

My heart pulses for you

 

Can you guess why this recipe is pulsing? This recipe contains Canadian pulses--or beans. A tasty and healthy treat that has minimal or no sugar. Keep reading!

All the ingredients are Canadian and fair-trade.  This treat is also packed with incredible saturated fats and protein. And it tastes like a treat!  It's so nutritious you can eat it for breakfast!. . .or anytime for that matter.  Well, let's get right to it.  As with all health-fully prepared food, it begins with time. The slow food movement is slow for a reason.

 

Ingredients:

1 cup fair-trade coconout oil & 2 TB

2/3 cup fair-trade shredded coconut

2/3 cup local and health-fully prepared black beans (any variety is fine)

2/3 cup local and health-fully prepared white-ish beans (any variety is fine)

1 cup fair trade semi-sweet chocolate chips (Or for the sugar-free option: . . . . __ squares of fair trade unsweetened chocolate)

splash of apple cider vinegar for soaking the beans

 

Instructions:

Step 1: Soaking. The day before (12-24 hours)

Soak at least 1/3 cup of EACH of your beans.  I always soak more so that we can use them for other meals.

Add a splash of apple cider vinegar (generally 1 TB per cup) & a dash baking soda to each soak.

Soak each for 12- 24 hours to remove phytic acid. 

Phytic acid is the protective barrier around the beans, that prohibits complete digestion of minerals and also produces bloating and gas. Once removed via soaking,  beans & grains become digestible for our bodies.  Employing this historical practice is a must for wholesome nutrition.

 (Note: You can skip step 1 & 2 for the beans if you buy canned beans. But not only are they prepared in a unwholesome manner and more expensive, but they most likely contain BPA from the can.)

 

Step 2: Cooking beans

Strain & rinse beans.

And then simmer beans for at least 2-4 hours (depending on how old your beans are, i.e. older beans take longer to cook)

Strain and rise again.

 

Step 3: Putting it all Together

1.  Melt 1 cup of coconut oil

2. In another sauce pan begin to melt chocolate and add 2 TB of coconut oil. It is best to do this in a double boiler so that your chocolate does not burn.

3.  In your food processor add:

  • melted coconut oil
  • 2/3 cup cooked white beans (room-temperature)
  • 2/3 cup shredded coconut

4.   Process until all ingredients are blended together

5.  Fold in 2/3 cup of cooked black beans (these mimic chocolate chips. . .yes, it's a sneaky way of eating nutrient-dense food!)

5.  Place the mixture in a small square pan (8 x 8 or 9 x 9)

6.  Pour the melted chocolate on mixture

7.  Cool in refrigerator for at least an hour

8.  Cut into small squares at room temperature. . .it must be room temperature or else the chocolate topping with crack.

 

Enjoy!

 

 

Posted by Wholly Canadian at 8:01 AM 0 Comments

Sunday, February 01, 2015

Bittersweet Dark Chocolate Bark: Bites of True Pleasure

 

A great deal of food that tastes good isn't good for us. . .this recipe is good for your health and good for community. . .and it tastes amazing!



Is it a candy, or is it a health food? You decide.

 

This is the perfect treat to wrap as a gift for the holidays, to give as a teacher's gift, to share as a hostess gift, or to offer in your candy dish (but beware that it will quickly disappear).


 

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup local raw pumpkin seeds
      • alternatively you can use any other seed or nut of your choice
  • 1 soft plump Level-Ground trading fair-trade vanilla pod
      • alternatively you can use 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract
  • 1/2  teaspoon of Solay course fair-trade sea salt
      • if you use a fine salt, use less
  • 1 TB fair-trade coconut oil, and a bit more to pan-roast the seeds in your skillet
  • 2 bags of Camino bittersweet fair-trade chocolate chips; approx 16 grams

 Many fair-trade ingredients can be found at Ten Thousand Villages


 

 

 Step 1: Wholesome Food Prep

  • Soak & deyhydrate your pumpkins seeds.

You can skip this step if you do not wish to do this to soak seeds.

 

 

Step 2:  Putting it all together

  1. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, leaving a small overhang. If you are not using a stoneware pan, you may want to grease the pan prior to placing the parchment paper, so that the paper is easily lifted later. Set the pan aside.
  2. Extract the vanilla seeds from the vanilla pod. See this link as a resource, or see this video for help.
    • research the many ways you can use the remaining vanilla pod
  3. In a double boiler, begin to melt the chocolate chips.
    • Add the 1 TB of coconut oil
    • Add the coconut seed paste from the vanilla pod.
  4. Heat a small skillet on medium heat.
    • Once the skillet is heated, add a bit of oil/butter and then add your pumpkin seeds.
    • Stir the pumpkin seeds  in the skillet continuously so that they do not burn
    • They are ready once a few of them have a slight brown tinge, or you can begin to hear them pop
    • You do not want the taste of burnt seeds
    • Take the seeds out of the pan so they do not continue to roast
  5. Stir the chocolate. Make sure no water gets into the pot or the chocolate will seize.
    • Once the chocolate is melted, add the pumpkins seeds and gently mix.
  6. Spread the mixture over the prepared sheet with a spatula.
    • The mixture may not reach to each corner of the pan. That's okay. Create a "puddle" of chocolate according to how thin you want your bark.
  7. Let the bark cool slightly for 5 minutes. After it has rested, sprinkle the sea salt on top.
  8. Place in the freezer for 30 minutes.
  9. Break into pieces.

 

 

 

 

Step 3: Enjoyment

To store, place in an air-tight container, or freeze for longer shelf-life.

Enjoy these bites of pure pleasure!

 


 

 

 

 

 

Why makes this recipe outstanding?

1. Nourishment: Whole Nutrition

    • minimal sugar by using bittersweet chocolate (71% cacao), but still yielding maximum pleasure
    • dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants;  pumpkin seeds are a source of manganese, phosphorus, copper, magnesium, zinc, protein, iron
    • recipe uses organic non-GMO ingredients, but it doesn't end there. . .
    • this recipe also involves traditional wholly nourishing food preparation; this quality of product is generally not available on grocery shelves
      • the seeds have been soaked using traditional methods to aid digestion; eliminating the anti-nutrients (phytic acid)  that contribute to gas and digestive pain associated with seeds and grains


2. Social Justice: Community Orientation

    • this recipe uses all local and/or fair-trade ingredients. . .
    • every bite is a bite of community & goodwill. . . rather than buying what is "cheapest for me," it thinks "we". . . giving way to true joy
    • for a good resource on why this matters see "Why localism"; many of the same principles also apply to fair-trade

 

 

What feature would prompt you to try this recipe?

 

manganese, phosphorus, copper, magnesium, zinc, protein, iron - See more at: http://whollycanadian.ca/food/recipes/soaking.cfm#sthash.ilZOuWts.dpuf

 

 

Posted by Wholly Canadian at 9:57 AM 0 Comments

Friday, January 16, 2015

Passionate Strawberry Smoothie

Passionate & Exotic Strawberry Smoothie

Winter blues call for some passion. . .and we've got a nutrition packed, flavour bursting, all-season smoothie for you!

Best of all is that is combines both local & fair-trade ingredients. . . so you can enjoy this with Wholly Canadian goodness {smile}

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 quart (4 cups) frozen/fresh local berries. . . the frozen berries makes this an all-season drink.
  • 1/2 cup fair-trade exotic dried fruit (dragon fruit, golden berry, and coconut)
    • I used Level Ground Trading exotic dried fruit purchased at Ten Thousand Villages
  • local raw honey  to taste. . . .or for a vegan alternative use fair-trade sugar
    • I used John Russell honey
  • enough water to blend the frozen berries

 

Blend. Makes about 4-5 cups.

 Topped with a slice of dried dragon fruit and dried coconut

 

Enjoy.  The exotic flavours will burst!

 

Nutritionally this drink is a winner! The vitamin C of the fruit, and the mineral content & enzymes of both the dried fruit and raw honey make this "virgin margarita" a really great go-to-drink!

And the simplicity of making it, makes it taste all the better {grin}

Posted by Wholly Canadian at 11:11 AM 0 Comments

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Wild Rice Burgers

Naosap Wild Rice Vegan Burgers

Sponsor: Naosap Harvest Wild Rice

These burgers are packed full or protein and are incredibly nutrient-dense! Each ingredient adds a boost to this power-packed vegan, gluten-free burger.

Naosap wild rice is a great choice when selecting your Canadian wild rice, see why here.

We adapted Naosap's wild rice burger recipe.  But we did it with a twist incorporating:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cooked Naosap Harvest Wild Rice
  • 1 cup cooked organic black beans 
  • 1 medium onion, diced fine
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 flax egg (mix 1 TB of flaxmeal with 2 TB warm water, mix, & let stand for 2 minutes)
  • 1 teaspoon of salt (I used American unrefined salt)
  • 1 teaspoon of freshly cracked fair-trade Arayuma black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon of fair-trade Arayuma  turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon fair-trade Arayuma chili peppers (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh oregano--finely chopped (if using dried, using 1/3 the amount)
  • 1 teaspoon of fresh thyme--finely chopped (if using dried, use 1/3 the amount)
  • 2 TB Three Farmers camelina oil, as well as some more for your skillet
  • 1/2 cup Naosap Harvest Wild Rice Flour for coating the burgers


Step 1: Wholesome traditional preparation (Day 1)

1. Soak black beans & wild rice traditionally. See our guide for instructions and why this is a whole-health choice.

  • If you do not wish to soak, cook beans and rice according to label directions and skip to Step 3.

2. Make sure to pre-measure your rice, so that you know how much water to cook it in later.

  • I always prepare more than the respective recipe requires for additional meals or freeze for later use.

Soaking the beans & rice the night before

Step 2: Cooking (Day 2)

1. Bring soaked black beans to a boil. And then simmer covered for 2-3 hours.

2. Cook the wild rice in broth or water.

  • Soaked wild rice takes less time to cook, and also requires less liquid than unsoaked rice. 
  • rinse the soaked rice
  • add water: 1 cup of soaked rice rice requires about 2.5 cups of liquid
  • bring to a boil, and simmer for about 40 min or just until kernels puff open; be careful not to overcook as with any rice it gets mushy. For chewier texture cook less time.
  • Drain any excess liquid.  
  • 1 cup yields 3-4 cups of cooked wild rice.

Cooked beans & rice the next day: digestable & nourishing

Step 3: Putting it all Together

1. Dice the onion and mince the clove of garlic.

  • using Three Farmer's camelina oil, in a large skillet (preferabley cast iron pan), sautee the onion & garlic on low-medium heat until golden but not burned

2. In a food processor, add all ingredients including the oil, except the wild rice flour.

  • blend, but leave some texture of the wild rice and beans. It just takes few seconds to get a crumbly but sticky mixture.

3.  Transfer the mixture into a bowl. Taste the mixture and adjust any seasoning to your liking.
  • if you have small kids you may want to omit the chilli pepper, or just add it to some of the mixture for adults.
  • you may want to add more salt or pepper according to taste.
4.  Create the patties:
  • set a plate next to the bowl with Naosap Wild Rice Flour.  Create a firm patty with your hands and drop into the flour, flip over to coat completely. 
5. Cook the patties:
  • heat some camelina oil in the same pan you sauteed the onions & garlic, and carefully drop the burgers into the pan
  • cook for about 2 -3 minutes on one side on medium heat, or until slightly golden and firmed up. Then flip over to the other side to cook until slightly golden.
  • you don’t want to touch them too much while they’re cooking or else they could break and crumble or stick to the pan. Leave them on the spot they are placed until ready to flip.
  • add more camelina oil if needed and continue with the rest of the batch.
Creates about 5 medium burgers

 

Vegan, Gluten Free, Meatless Burgers

Step 4: Serving

Here are some gourmet options for serving your wild rice burger:

  • Grain-free option: stacking the burger on some grilled slices of eggplant with kale, pickled red pepper, vegan mayo, grain mustard and organic ketchup. Serve with a basket full of carrot and cucumber sticks and eggplant fries.

  • Traditional Foods Option: Wholly Canadian served this burger on traditional sourdough bread, garden tomato & kale, mayo, and cultured garlic-basil kefir cheese.
Want to boost the eating choices and health of your family? We're offering traditional food learning opportunities  . . . Incorporate wholesome traditional foods steeped in probiotics and whole-food digestable nutrients in your diet! Start today by investigating.

 

Wild rice burger on traditional sourdough bread laden with cultured garlic, basil kefir cheese


This burger is a bit of a marvel in it's own right. It's a mixture of fair-trade and local ingredients with some of the most nutrient-dense ingredients on planet earth!  It's laden with goodwill in every sense.

It also provides a mouth-watering, gourmet sensory experience. {grin}


 

 



Posted by Wholly Canadian at 7:00 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, May 29, 2014

“Baby Cakes”--Cookies for the Whole Family

 

baby cakes wholly canadian cookies gluten free

These cookies are so wonderfully suited for the whole family. They are free of all common allergens (egg, dairy, gluten, and grain), and also sugar free!

Nutrition:

Grains & Babies:

Weston Price Foundation recommends that babies refrain from grains until at least a year (note: molars can be an indication of readiness for grains) because babies do not have  sufficient digestive enzymes to digest grain. This enzyme, amylase, necessary to digest grains, is generally produced after baby is a year. Historically, babies were not fed grains until at least a year. Interesting how North American conventional practice encourages grain as the first food, and but then also has so many adults with gut issues.

 Quinoa is a pseudo-grain.  It does not have the same allergenic properties that grain has, and is more similar to a seed. This is why it makes it a perfect carboydrate to give to baby prior to introducing grains.  "Quinoa is the food that most resembles mother’s milk.”" According to Dr. Duane Johnson of the University of Colorado, if human beings were forced to eat only one food, quinoa would be the one to choose.  It is a complete protein and contains all nine necessary amino acids for growth and development. In addition to protein, quinoa contains starchy carbohydrates, dietary fiber, phosphorus, magnesium and iron.  Amazing!

 So go ahead, and try these cake-like cookies for your whole family!  They are densely packed with nutrients (omega fatty acids, healthy saturated fats, amino acids, protein, complex carbohydrates, antioxidants, iron,etc) , and offer a  wonderful pick-me-up snack for that craving.

 And the best part: they are Wholly Canadian & Fair Trade. Every single ingredient.  Did you know quinoa is grown in Canada?  Find it your local health store, and enjoy the thought of supporting local farmers with every bite!

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cooked Canadian-grown quinoa
  • 1/2 cup cooked Canadian-grown beans. Most beans will work, so you choose!
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 3 TB of fair-trade shredded coconut
  • 3 TB Canadian-grown flax (2 TB flaxmeal & 1 TB whole flaxseed)
  • 2 heaping TB of fair-trade coconut oil
  • handful of locally-grown dried fruit
  • handful of locally-grown blueberries, fresh or frozen

baby cakes ingredient pic wholly canadian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 1: Soaking. The day before (12-24 hours)

Soak at least 1/2 cup of quinoa. Pre measure your quinoa so you will know how much water to add later.

Soak at least 1/2 cup of beans.  

You can skip step 1 & 2 for the beans if you buy canned beans. But not only are they prepared in a unwholesome manner and more expensive, but they most likely contain BPA from the can.

Soak them separately in glass containers. I always soak more so that we can use them for other meals.

Add a splash of apple cider vinegar (generally 1 TB per cup) & a dash baking soda to each soak.

Soak each for 12- 24 hours to remove phytic acid. 

Phytic acid is the protective barrier around the beans, that prohibits complete digestion of minerals and also produces bloating and gas. Once removed via soaking,  beans & grains become digestible for our bodies.  Employing this historical practice is a must for wholesome nutrition.

 

Step 2: Cooking beans & quinoa

soaking beans wholly canadian quinoa

Strain & rinse beans.

Strain & rinse quinoa

Simmer beans for at least 2-4 hours (depending on how old your beans are, i.e. older beans take longer to cook)

Cook quinoa according to directions.  Add water according to the measured pre-soaked quinoa. 

 

Step 3: Putting it all Together

Preheata oven to 350 degrees

Grind 2 TB of flax into flax meal. (Or you can just use 2 TB of pre-ground flax meal)

Cut up dried fruit into manageable pieces

In your food processor add:

  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1/2 cup packed-down beans
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 3 TB shredded coconut
  • 2 TB of ground flax meal
  • 1 TB of whole flaxseed
  • 2 heaping TB of coconut oil. (If you have an efficient food processor you may not need to melt this prior to adding it. I don’t, to save a step)

Process this until all ingredients until you they are well mixed

Allow ingredients to sit for 10 minutes for flaxmeal to gelatinize with other ingredients

Fold in bite-sized dried fruit. (This gives texture for your baby and encourages them to learn to chew)

{Optional} Gently fold in blueberries. If you using frozen, make sure they are still in a frozen state so they remain intact.

Use a cookie scoop to shape cookies.  Makes 15 small cookies.

Bake for 22- 25 minutes. Depending on what type of pan you use and if your berries are frozen.

 

 

Notes: 

As this recipe makes about 15 cookies, I usually double it and freeze half of them.

They will last about 6 day in the fridge.

 
Posted by Wholly Canadian at 12:10 PM 0 Comments

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

Raspberry Buckwheat Hazelnut Thumbprint Cookies

Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba

Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba

Ingredients

Dry Ingredients

  • 2 cups freshly ground buckwheat flour
    • 1 cup of buckwheat groats= approx 2 cups of freshly ground flour
  • 1 cup raw hazelnut kernels
    • 1 cup kernels = 1 approx 1 1/8 cup coarsely ground hazelnuts
  • 2 tablespoons whole flaxseeds
    • 1 TB flax seed = approx 1 heaping TB ground flaxmeal
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Wet Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup cold-pressed camelina oil or sunflower oil.
    • Both of these cold-pressed oils are suitable for baking
    • Note: The camelina oil will give your cookies a much earthier/"healthy" taste. Choose your oil depending on taste.
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1/3 cup & 1 TB maple syrup
  • 2-3 teaspoons vanilla
  • sugar-free raspberry jam (preferably sweetened w/ honey or maple syrup)

Instructions

    1. Grind hazelnuts in food processor. Be careful not to over grind so that it becomes a nut butter. You still want texture
    2. Grind flax seed. For optimum nutritional value (instead of already processed flaxmeal) grind your flax seed in a coffee grinder set aside for this job
    3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a large cookie sheet with coconut oil
    4. Mix dry ingredients in mixer
    5. Add the wet ingredients
    6. Form dough into balls with your hands and place onto the cookie sheet
    7. Make an indent or "nest" in each cookie with your thumb
    8. Then drop some jam into each thumbprint
    9. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes. Timing will depend on the size of your cookies

Nutrition Awareness

This dish offers an array of nutritional value to your diet:

      • Protein source
      • Fibre packed
      • Hazelnuts contains phytopchemicals, including proanthocyanidins, quercetin and kaempherol. These proanthocyanidins belong to a group called the flavonoids. Flavonoids may support brain health, improve circulation and reduce symptoms associated with allergies
      • Hazelnuts contain heart-healthy fats that can protect heart health. Specifically, they are high in healthy polyunsaturated and mononunsaturated fats and low in unhealthier unsaturated fats. Hazelnuts are a good source of oleic acid. Oleic acid can help to lower levels of bad cholesterol, LDL, and can raise levels of good cholesterol, HDL, in the body.
      • Camelina Oil is unique in that it provides the necessary daily intake of Omega-3 fatty acids that our body requires while at the same time, has the ability to function as a culinary oil. Olive oil is abundant in mono-unsaturated fat and functions as a culinary oil, but does not have the nutritional advantages that are inherent in Camelina oil. Canola oil lacks the Omega-3 characteristic and is typically not sold in its cold-pressed state. Canola oil is usually stripped of colour and odour and then fortified with stabilizers to allow for high temperature cooking and extended shelf life.

Categorization: Canadian Flavours

Seasonal Rhythm: All Season

Dietary Specifications Taglines:

    • Vegan
    • Gluten free
    • Refined sugar free
Posted by Wholly Canadian at 2:53 PM 0 Comments

Monday, March 03, 2014

Coconut Milk

Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba

Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups purified water
  • 1 cup fair-trade unsweetened coconut
    • You can modify the water to coconut ratio depending on the "creaminess" desired.
  • 1 tsp raw honey, or maple syrup (vegan option)
  • 1/2 tsp pure vanilla

Other Optional ingredients

Use ingredients that are fair trade or processed-in-Canada as I did for ethical "flavours."

  • 1/8 tsp xanthan gum (this provides a consistency to your milk and reduces separation between water and hemp)

Instructions:

  1. Blend all ingredients in blender for about 2-3 minutes
  2. Optional: Strain the Milk
    • Place a sieve a top your choice of jug and a cheese cloth/nut cloth in the sieve, and pour coconut milk through the cloth and sieve for a strained consistency.
    • You can use the pulp in baking or in your cereal for extra fibre. (Refrigerate for a few days)
  3. Refrigerate coconut milk and enjoy within 3-4 days.
    • Shake each time before using.
  4. You may also freeze the contents and make larger batches.
  5. Makes 2 cups

Nutrition Awareness

This dish offers an array of nutritional value to your diet:

  • Protein source
  • Fibre packed
  • High in Vitamin C
  • High in manganese to regulate blood sugar
  • High in calcium
  • Boosts the immune system because of its medium-chain fatty acids are composed of lauric acid, which is anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-microbial and anti-fungal thus strengthening the immune system.

Categorization: Canadian Flavours Meet Fair Trade

Seasonal Rhythm: All Season

Dietary Specifications Taglines:

  • Vegan
  • Gluten free
Posted by Wholly Canadian at 4:42 PM 0 Comments

Monday, March 03, 2014

Roasted Hazelnut Hot Chocolate

Ready for a warm, healthy, treat drink? Best of all this drink uses all local and fair-trade ingredients.

Feel good on the inside and outside while drinking!

Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba

Ingredients

  • 1/8 cup fair trade cocoa powder
  • 2 ounces bittersweet/semi-sweet chocolate (approx 50 grams)
  • 4 cups fair-trade sweetened coconut milk
  • 1/3 heaping cup of raw hazelnut kernels (approx 50 grams)
  • 2 TB raw honey, or maple syrup (vegan option)
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven or smaller toaster oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Roast hazelnuts in single layer until golden and skins begin to crack. Approx 8-10 min.
    • Optional: Once roasted, place in clean tea towel and rub to remove the skins.
  3. Coarsely chop chocolate. Note if you have a hot/soup feature on your blender, you do not have to chop the chocolate.
  4. In the blender add all ingredients until smooth and frothy.
    • If you have a hot/soup feature on your blender, select that feature now and omit step #5.
  5. Pour blended ingredients in saucepan. Heat over medium heat. Stir frequently so the bottom doesn't burn. Heat until it begins to steam. Do not boil.
  6. Top with additional chopped nuts and chocolate shavings.
  7. Refrigerate leftovers and enjoy hot or cold within 3-4 days.
    • Shake each time before using.
  8. Makes approx 4 servings.

Nutrition Awareness

This dish offers an array of nutritional value to your diet:

  • Protein source
  • Fibre packed
  • Coconut is high in manganese to regulate blood sugar
  • Coconut and Hazelnuts are a source of calcium
  • Coconut boosts the immune system because of its medium-chain fatty acids are composed of lauric acid, which is anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-microbial and anti-fungal thus strengthening the immune system.
  • Hazelnuts contains phytopchemicals, including proanthocyanidins, quercetin and kaempherol. These proanthocyanidins belong to a group called the flavonoids. Flavonoids may support brain health, improve circulation and reduce symptoms associated with allergies
  • Hazelnuts contain heart-healthy fats that can protect heart health. Specifically, they are high in healthy polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats and low in unhealthier unsaturated fats. Hazelnuts are a good source of oleic acid. Oleic acid can help to lower levels of bad cholesterol, LDL, and can raise levels of good cholesterol, HDL, in the body.

Categorization: Canadian Flavours Meet Fair Trade

Seasonal Rhythm: All Season

Dietary Specifications Taglines:

  • Vegan
  • Gluten free
Posted by Wholly Canadian at 4:09 PM 0 Comments

Monday, March 03, 2014

Summer Love Strawberry Vinaigrette

Use this vinaigrette for assembling your favourite berry salad using fresh local greens. This dressing is so healthy and so tasty!

Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup cold pressed sunflower oil or cold pressed canola oil
  • 3 TB apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tsp raw honey OR pure maple syrup
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/3 cup fresh basil packed (use locally-grown hydroponic for the winter season)
  • 1 heaping cup strawberries (use 1 heaping cup frozen strawberries for an all season recipe)

Instructions

  1. Place ingredients in the blender in the order listed.
  2. Blend well until smooth.
  3. Pour dressing over fresh local greens. Add optional toppings like nuts, berries, and feta cheese.

Yields 1 1/2 cup. Refrigerate in an airtight container for a couple of weeks.

Nutrition Awareness

This dish offers an array of nutritional value to your diet:

  • Apple cider vinegar flushes out toxins from your body, and gives your skin a boost. Also is reported to help regulate blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure.
  • The cold-pressed oil in this vinaigrette is a great way to boost your omega intake
  • Vitamin C boost

Categorization: Wholly Canadian: 100% Canadian Ingredients

Seasonal Rhythm: Summer & All Season

Dietary Specifications Taglines:

  • Vegan
  • Gluten free
  • Raw food
Posted by Wholly Canadian at 4:00 PM 0 Comments

Monday, December 10, 2012

Hemp Milk

Note: this recipe uses a large capacity blender. If your blender cannot hold these contents, halve all the ingredients.

Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba

Ingredients

  • 6 cups purified water
  • 1 cup raw shelled hemp hearts
    You can modify the water to hemp ratio depending on the "creaminess" desired.

Optional Wholly Canadian ingredients

  • 2 heaping TB raw honey or maple syrup (vegan option)
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Other Optional ingredients

Note: When using these ingredients, the hemp milk is no longer Wholly Canadian. Use ingredients that are fair trade or processed-in-Canada as I did for ethical "flavours".

  • 1 1/2 tsp pure vanilla
  • 1/4 tsp xanthan gum (this provides a consistency to your milk and reduces separation between water and hemp)

Instructions

  1. Blend all ingredients in blender for about 2-3 minutes
  2. Optional:Strain the Milk
    • Place a sieve a top your choice of jug and a cheese cloth in the sieve, and pour hemp milk through the cheese cloth and sieve for a strained consistency.
    • You can use extract the pulp from the cheese cloth in baking or in your cereal for extra fibre.
  3. Refrigerate hemp milk and enjoy within 3-4 days.
    • Shake each time before using.
  4. You may also freeze the contents and make larger batches.

Nutrition Awareness

This dish offers an array of nutritional value to your diet:

  • Protein source
  • Fibre packed
  • Omega rich
  • Phytonutrients from raw honey
  • Hemp is a great food for a naturally anti-inflammatory

Categorization: Wholly Canadian: 100% Canadian Ingredients

Seasonal Rhythm: All Season

Dietary Specifications Taglines:

  • Vegan
  • Vegetarian
  • Raw food
  • Gluten free
Posted by Wholly Canadian at 12:42 PM 0 Comments