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Wholly Canadian Blog

Saturday, December 12, 2015

My heart pulses for you

 

Can you guess why this recipe is pulsing? This recipe contains Canadian pulses--or beans. A tasty and healthy treat that has minimal or no sugar. Keep reading!

All the ingredients are Canadian and fair-trade.  This treat is also packed with incredible saturated fats and protein. And it tastes like a treat!  It's so nutritious you can eat it for breakfast!. . .or anytime for that matter.  Well, let's get right to it.  As with all health-fully prepared food, it begins with time. The slow food movement is slow for a reason.

 

Ingredients:

1 cup fair-trade coconout oil & 2 TB

2/3 cup fair-trade shredded coconut

2/3 cup local and health-fully prepared black beans (any variety is fine)

2/3 cup local and health-fully prepared white-ish beans (any variety is fine)

1 cup fair trade semi-sweet chocolate chips (Or for the sugar-free option: . . . . __ squares of fair trade unsweetened chocolate)

splash of apple cider vinegar for soaking the beans

 

Instructions:

Step 1: Soaking. The day before (12-24 hours)

Soak at least 1/3 cup of EACH of your beans.  I always soak more so that we can use them for other meals.

Add a splash of apple cider vinegar (generally 1 TB per cup) & a dash baking soda to each soak.

Soak each for 12- 24 hours to remove phytic acid. 

Phytic acid is the protective barrier around the beans, that prohibits complete digestion of minerals and also produces bloating and gas. Once removed via soaking,  beans & grains become digestible for our bodies.  Employing this historical practice is a must for wholesome nutrition.

 (Note: You can skip step 1 & 2 for the beans if you buy canned beans. But not only are they prepared in a unwholesome manner and more expensive, but they most likely contain BPA from the can.)

 

Step 2: Cooking beans

Strain & rinse beans.

And then simmer beans for at least 2-4 hours (depending on how old your beans are, i.e. older beans take longer to cook)

Strain and rise again.

 

Step 3: Putting it all Together

1.  Melt 1 cup of coconut oil

2. In another sauce pan begin to melt chocolate and add 2 TB of coconut oil. It is best to do this in a double boiler so that your chocolate does not burn.

3.  In your food processor add:

  • melted coconut oil
  • 2/3 cup cooked white beans (room-temperature)
  • 2/3 cup shredded coconut

4.   Process until all ingredients are blended together

5.  Fold in 2/3 cup of cooked black beans (these mimic chocolate chips. . .yes, it's a sneaky way of eating nutrient-dense food!)

5.  Place the mixture in a small square pan (8 x 8 or 9 x 9)

6.  Pour the melted chocolate on mixture

7.  Cool in refrigerator for at least an hour

8.  Cut into small squares at room temperature. . .it must be room temperature or else the chocolate topping with crack.

 

Enjoy!

 

 

Posted by Wholly Canadian at 8:01 AM 0 Comments

Thursday, May 29, 2014

“Baby Cakes”--Cookies for the Whole Family

 

baby cakes wholly canadian cookies gluten free

These cookies are so wonderfully suited for the whole family. They are free of all common allergens (egg, dairy, gluten, and grain), and also sugar free!

Nutrition:

Grains & Babies:

Weston Price Foundation recommends that babies refrain from grains until at least a year (note: molars can be an indication of readiness for grains) because babies do not have  sufficient digestive enzymes to digest grain. This enzyme, amylase, necessary to digest grains, is generally produced after baby is a year. Historically, babies were not fed grains until at least a year. Interesting how North American conventional practice encourages grain as the first food, and but then also has so many adults with gut issues.

 Quinoa is a pseudo-grain.  It does not have the same allergenic properties that grain has, and is more similar to a seed. This is why it makes it a perfect carboydrate to give to baby prior to introducing grains.  "Quinoa is the food that most resembles mother’s milk.”" According to Dr. Duane Johnson of the University of Colorado, if human beings were forced to eat only one food, quinoa would be the one to choose.  It is a complete protein and contains all nine necessary amino acids for growth and development. In addition to protein, quinoa contains starchy carbohydrates, dietary fiber, phosphorus, magnesium and iron.  Amazing!

 So go ahead, and try these cake-like cookies for your whole family!  They are densely packed with nutrients (omega fatty acids, healthy saturated fats, amino acids, protein, complex carbohydrates, antioxidants, iron,etc) , and offer a  wonderful pick-me-up snack for that craving.

 And the best part: they are Wholly Canadian & Fair Trade. Every single ingredient.  Did you know quinoa is grown in Canada?  Find it your local health store, and enjoy the thought of supporting local farmers with every bite!

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cooked Canadian-grown quinoa
  • 1/2 cup cooked Canadian-grown beans. Most beans will work, so you choose!
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 3 TB of fair-trade shredded coconut
  • 3 TB Canadian-grown flax (2 TB flaxmeal & 1 TB whole flaxseed)
  • 2 heaping TB of fair-trade coconut oil
  • handful of locally-grown dried fruit
  • handful of locally-grown blueberries, fresh or frozen

baby cakes ingredient pic wholly canadian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 1: Soaking. The day before (12-24 hours)

Soak at least 1/2 cup of quinoa. Pre measure your quinoa so you will know how much water to add later.

Soak at least 1/2 cup of beans.  

You can skip step 1 & 2 for the beans if you buy canned beans. But not only are they prepared in a unwholesome manner and more expensive, but they most likely contain BPA from the can.

Soak them separately in glass containers. I always soak more so that we can use them for other meals.

Add a splash of apple cider vinegar (generally 1 TB per cup) & a dash baking soda to each soak.

Soak each for 12- 24 hours to remove phytic acid. 

Phytic acid is the protective barrier around the beans, that prohibits complete digestion of minerals and also produces bloating and gas. Once removed via soaking,  beans & grains become digestible for our bodies.  Employing this historical practice is a must for wholesome nutrition.

 

Step 2: Cooking beans & quinoa

soaking beans wholly canadian quinoa

Strain & rinse beans.

Strain & rinse quinoa

Simmer beans for at least 2-4 hours (depending on how old your beans are, i.e. older beans take longer to cook)

Cook quinoa according to directions.  Add water according to the measured pre-soaked quinoa. 

 

Step 3: Putting it all Together

Preheata oven to 350 degrees

Grind 2 TB of flax into flax meal. (Or you can just use 2 TB of pre-ground flax meal)

Cut up dried fruit into manageable pieces

In your food processor add:

  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1/2 cup packed-down beans
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 3 TB shredded coconut
  • 2 TB of ground flax meal
  • 1 TB of whole flaxseed
  • 2 heaping TB of coconut oil. (If you have an efficient food processor you may not need to melt this prior to adding it. I don’t, to save a step)

Process this until all ingredients until you they are well mixed

Allow ingredients to sit for 10 minutes for flaxmeal to gelatinize with other ingredients

Fold in bite-sized dried fruit. (This gives texture for your baby and encourages them to learn to chew)

{Optional} Gently fold in blueberries. If you using frozen, make sure they are still in a frozen state so they remain intact.

Use a cookie scoop to shape cookies.  Makes 15 small cookies.

Bake for 22- 25 minutes. Depending on what type of pan you use and if your berries are frozen.

 

 

Notes: 

As this recipe makes about 15 cookies, I usually double it and freeze half of them.

They will last about 6 day in the fridge.

 
Posted by Wholly Canadian at 12:10 PM 0 Comments

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

Raspberry Buckwheat Hazelnut Thumbprint Cookies

Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba

Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba Wholly Canadian - Localism - Manitoba

Ingredients

Dry Ingredients

  • 2 cups freshly ground buckwheat flour
    • 1 cup of buckwheat groats= approx 2 cups of freshly ground flour
  • 1 cup raw hazelnut kernels
    • 1 cup kernels = 1 approx 1 1/8 cup coarsely ground hazelnuts
  • 2 tablespoons whole flaxseeds
    • 1 TB flax seed = approx 1 heaping TB ground flaxmeal
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Wet Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup cold-pressed camelina oil or sunflower oil.
    • Both of these cold-pressed oils are suitable for baking
    • Note: The camelina oil will give your cookies a much earthier/"healthy" taste. Choose your oil depending on taste.
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1/3 cup & 1 TB maple syrup
  • 2-3 teaspoons vanilla
  • sugar-free raspberry jam (preferably sweetened w/ honey or maple syrup)

Instructions

    1. Grind hazelnuts in food processor. Be careful not to over grind so that it becomes a nut butter. You still want texture
    2. Grind flax seed. For optimum nutritional value (instead of already processed flaxmeal) grind your flax seed in a coffee grinder set aside for this job
    3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a large cookie sheet with coconut oil
    4. Mix dry ingredients in mixer
    5. Add the wet ingredients
    6. Form dough into balls with your hands and place onto the cookie sheet
    7. Make an indent or "nest" in each cookie with your thumb
    8. Then drop some jam into each thumbprint
    9. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes. Timing will depend on the size of your cookies

Nutrition Awareness

This dish offers an array of nutritional value to your diet:

      • Protein source
      • Fibre packed
      • Hazelnuts contains phytopchemicals, including proanthocyanidins, quercetin and kaempherol. These proanthocyanidins belong to a group called the flavonoids. Flavonoids may support brain health, improve circulation and reduce symptoms associated with allergies
      • Hazelnuts contain heart-healthy fats that can protect heart health. Specifically, they are high in healthy polyunsaturated and mononunsaturated fats and low in unhealthier unsaturated fats. Hazelnuts are a good source of oleic acid. Oleic acid can help to lower levels of bad cholesterol, LDL, and can raise levels of good cholesterol, HDL, in the body.
      • Camelina Oil is unique in that it provides the necessary daily intake of Omega-3 fatty acids that our body requires while at the same time, has the ability to function as a culinary oil. Olive oil is abundant in mono-unsaturated fat and functions as a culinary oil, but does not have the nutritional advantages that are inherent in Camelina oil. Canola oil lacks the Omega-3 characteristic and is typically not sold in its cold-pressed state. Canola oil is usually stripped of colour and odour and then fortified with stabilizers to allow for high temperature cooking and extended shelf life.

Categorization: Canadian Flavours

Seasonal Rhythm: All Season

Dietary Specifications Taglines:

    • Vegan
    • Gluten free
    • Refined sugar free
Posted by Wholly Canadian at 2:53 PM 0 Comments